Top 10 Reasons to Seek Accreditation

Top Ten Reasons to Seek Accreditation

A scan of the career listings on the CPRS Job board will show that membership in a professional association and accreditation are increasingly valued by HR reps and employers when seeking qualified candidates.
The accreditation process is a self-directed professional development activity that will broaden your knowledge of communications management and strategy. Completing the process will prepare you to pursue greater on-the-job responsibility and the increased professional satisfaction (and compensation) that comes with it.
North American studies of accredited communicators have shown notable differences in earning potentials between those who are accredited and those who aren’t.
All else being equal, accreditation can tip the scales of a hiring decision in your favour because it demonstrates a high level of commitment and engagement with your career.
While existing skills and knowledge are required for success, by completing the accreditation process, you will likely learn even more. During the yearlong study process, candidates get the opportunity to learn from the experience of their peers and often take away much more than just a new designation.
Accreditation may not be easy, but it’s very rewarding. If you can take on the responsibility of achieving accreditation, it’s safe to say that you can take on any task and be counted on to succeed.
Whether you are mid-career or a senior practitioner, a professional designation helps empower and affirm by reminding you of your talent, skills and abilities.
Although some may question the validity of our profession, the respected status of public relations and your career will be maintained and elevated through your commitment to the Code of Professional Standards and ethical practice.
Many professions and occupations today have developed their own credentials to signify professional excellence. Having APR behind your name means you take your career seriously and that you're committed to upholding the highest levels of professional standards.
Being an APR comes with responsibilities to CPRS, to the PR profession and to the community at large, but it also comes with professional recognition from peers and other practitioners.